Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400 @ Singapore Airshow

Singapore Airlines will be phasing out and retiring their fleet of Boeing 747-400s come March. The 747-400 is better known as the 744 to aviation enthusiasts, or the Megatop to the general public (before SIA scraped the acronyms (i.e. Megatop, Leadership, Jubilee…) off their fleet).

 

Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400 (9V-SPQ) on the tarmac.

 

Thanks to Boeing, I had the opportunity to attend a special media tour of the aircraft yesterday before it was opened to public at the Singapore Airshow today. The Boeing 747-400 on display (registration 9V-SPQ), was ‘modified’ with banners and posters to showcase the history and journey of the 747 life span.

 

Singapore Airlines will operate the last Boeing 747 flight out of Singapore come April 6th, destination Hong Kong, to mark the retirement of their previous flagship. After close to 40 years of service, this flight will be a commemorative and extended one, and will play host to more than 300 commercial passengers, special guests and members of the media. You can still purchase the return tickets at the Singapore Airlines website for just over S$700!

 

(via Superadrianme)

The last flight out of Singapore on the 747 is scheduled to take off at 0830 hrs, code named SQ 747.

The last flight in will touch down in Singapore at 1930 hrs, code named SQ 748.

 

Meanwhile, enjoy the photos of the Boeing 747-400 media tour.

 

The Boeing 747 on display was registered 9V-SPQ.

 

Front landing gear of 9V-SPQ

 

16 massive wheels make up the rear landing gear of a Boeing 747-400. Every landing is a heavy one, and might cause potholes in the runway.

 

Stepping on board Singapore Airlines Boeing 747!

 

Economy Class section

 

KrisWorld entertainment system - my favourite on board any SQ flights.

 

An article from the Asian Wall Street Journal showcasing SIA's record buy of 744s.

 

Mind games to keep children (and adults) occupied on board SQ flights.

 

Business Class seats on board the Boeing 747-400

 

Upper deck of the Boeing 747-400 houses only Business Class.

 

Business Class seats with SIA's full-reclining SpaceBed.

 

Moving on to First Class at the front of the lower deck! The First Class seats come with fully reclining seats known as the SkySuites.

 

A replica model of the very first Singapore Girl to appear on commercials, both TV and print.

 

Here are some of the more significant milestones in the journey of the Boeing 747.

 

  • 3 September 1973 – Singapore Airlines took delivery of its first two Boeing 747-200 (742).
  • 1 October 1973 – The maiden 742 flight took off from Changi, bound for Tokyo via Hong Kong and Taipei.
  • 28 April 1983 – Singapore took delivery of the first Boeing 747-300, and was named Big Top.
  • 18 March 1989 – The first Megatop (Boeing 747-400, or 744 in short), was delivered to Singapore Airlines.
  • 27 March 1989 – Singapore Airlines became the first airline to operate a commercial flight across the Pacific Ocean with the 744.
  • 14 October 1993 – Delivery of Boeing’s 1000th 744 to Singapore Airlines.
  • 21 April 1995 – KrisWorld, the world’s most advanced inflight entertainment system, was introduced on board two of Singapore Airline’s 744.
  • 31 March 2003 – Singapore Airline’s 747 fleet grew to 51, comprising of 39 passenger planes and 12 freighters, coded Mega Ark.
  • 25 March 2012 – Singapore Airlines will operate the last regular commercial 744 flight from Melbourne bound for Singapore.
  • 6 April 2012 – Singapore Airlines will operate the last two commercial flights on board the 747s on the SIN-HK-SIN route. The flight codes are SQ 747 and SQ 748.

You can still catch 9V-SPQ at the Singapore Airshow. The Singapore Airshow will close on 19 February 2012, and will return in 2014.

 

Till then, good bye to the Queen of the Skies. Thank you for the 40 odd years of wonderful service.

 

The closing of a chapter in the pages of Singapore's aviation. Good bye, Megatop.

 

 

 

 

*The copyright of all photographs belong to me. Please contact me if you wish to reproduce any photographs. It is a violation of intellectual property right if you use photographs without proper credits and permission.

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